Juicy Tattle

News for nerds

There’s no questioning the benefits of Twitter. It’s a convenient way to get your memes, world news, and pop culture hot takes all in one place.

But being an active Twitter user requires sifting through a daily deluge of toxic characters, including white supremacists, bots, deepfakes, the president of the United States, and more. Plus, there’s no denying the stress and anxiety that the fast pace of Twitter’s news cycle, and the strain of constantly debating reply guys, can bring.

Hear me out on this: you don’t actually have to use Twitter. I know it seems like everyone else is using it, but you can be the change you want to see in the world. You can just delete your account.

Don’t worry: it doesn’t have to be permanent. If you find yourself feeling empty and directionless after doing this, you can get your account back up to 30 days after the fact. But if it ever gets to be too much again, just come back to this article and follow the steps. There’s a whole world outside of your timeline to explore.

DEACTIVATE YOUR TWITTER ACCOUNT IN A BROWSER

If you’re on a computer or in a mobile browser, go to Twitter.com and log in to your account. To deactivate:

  • On the web, click the “More” item on the bottom-left of the screen. On the mobile browser, tap your profile icon.
  • Select “Settings and Privacy” and then “Account”
  • At the bottom of the list, tap “Deactivate your account”

You’ll see a screen informing you that doing this will, in fact, deactivate your account. Ignore it, and press “Deactivate” again at the bottom.

DEACTIVATE YOUR TWITTER ACCOUNT IN THE TWITTER APP

If you’re using a smartphone, go to the Twitter app and make sure you’re logged in.

  • Tap your profile icon in the top-left corner. A menu will pop out from the side. Tap “Settings and privacy” on the bottom.
  • Tap “Account” at the top. In the account settings page, select “Deactivate your account” at the bottom.

A few things to note:

  • To reiterate: your account won’t be permanently gone after this process. Twitter retains your information for 30 days before deleting it permanently. To restore your account, just log back in.
  • If you plan to create a new Twitter account with the same username and email address as the account you’re deactivating, switch the current account to a different username and email address before you deactivate
  • If you want to download your Twitter data, do that before deactivating. Twitter can’t send data from inactive accounts.
  • Google and other search engines cache results, meaning your old profile and tweets may still pop up in response to search queries on occasion. However, anyone who clicks them will get an error message.

Deactivating your account can be a hassle, but to Twitter’s credit, it’s much more straightforward than the process of deleting some other services, such as Uber and Lyft.